Related Books

Treatment for Hoarding Disorder
Language: en
Pages: 224
Authors: Gail Steketee, Randy O. Frost
Categories: Medical
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-11 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

Previous ed. titled: Compulsive hoarding and acquiring: client workbook.
CBT for Hoarding Disorder
Language: en
Pages: 200
Authors: David F. Tolin, Blaise L. Worden, Bethany M. Wootton, Christina M. Gilliam
Categories: Psychology
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-09-05 - Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

Part of a two-component product with a companion client workbook, CBT for Hoarding Disorder: Therapist's Guide guides group leaders through a comprehensive CBT group program for patients struggling with hoarding disorder. Provides step-by-step, evidence-based guidance for treating hoarding disorder (HD) with a focus on proven methods for behavior change rather
Group Treatment for Hoarding Disorder
Language: en
Pages: 364
Authors: Jordana Muroff, Patty Underwood, Gail Steketee
Categories: Psychology
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014 - Publisher: Treatments That Work

Group Treatment for Hoarding Disorder: Therapist Guide outlines a cognitive-behavioral therapy program for HD using a group model.
CBT for Hoarding Disorder
Language: en
Pages: 176
Authors: David F. Tolin, Blaise L. Worden, Bethany M. Wootton, Christina M. Gilliam
Categories: Psychology
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-09-05 - Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

Part of a two-component product with a companion therapist's guide, CBT for Hoarding Disorder: Client Workbook guides patients struggling with hoarding disorder who are enrolled in a comprehensive CBT group program through the therapeutic process of addressing and overcoming their difficulties. Designed for participants in group cognitive-behavioral therapy for hoarding
Treatment for Hoarding Disorder
Language: en
Pages: 262
Authors: Gail Steketee, Randy O. Frost
Categories: Behavior therapy
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014 - Publisher:

"The relationship people have with their possessions ranges from purely utilitarian to intensely emotional. For most people, their personal possessions provide them with a sense of security, comfort, and pleasure. However, if someone loses the ability to distinguish useful or important possessions from those that make life overly complicated, the