Related Books

The Last Century of Sea Power
Language: en
Pages: 568
Authors: H. P. Willmott
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009-06-09 - Publisher: Indiana University Press

The transition to modern war at sea began during the period of the Sino-Japanese War (1894–1895) and the Spanish-American War (1898) and was propelled forward rapidly by the advent of the dreadnought and the nearly continuous state of war that culminated in World War I. By 1922, most of the
The Last Century of Sea Power
Language: en
Pages: 704
Authors: H. P. Willmott
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010-03-22 - Publisher: Indiana University Press

In this second volume of his history of naval power in the 20th century, H. P. Willmott follows the fortunes of the established seafaring nations of Europe along with two upstarts—the United States and Japan. Emerging from World War I in command of the seas, Great Britain saw its supremacy
The Last Century of Sea Power: From Port Arthur to Chanak, 1894-1922
Language: en
Pages: 543
Authors: H. P. Willmott
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009 - Publisher:

The first volume of a magisterial study of naval power in the 20th century
War, Strategy and the Modern State, 1792–1914
Language: en
Pages: 248
Authors: Carl Cavanagh Hodge
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-11-25 - Publisher: Routledge

This book is a comparative study of military operations conducted my modern states between the French Revolution and World War I. It examines the complex relationship between political purpose and strategy on the one hand, and the challenge of realizing strategic goals through military operations on the other. It argues
Athenia Torpedoed
Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: Francis Carroll
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-10-15 - Publisher: Naval Institute Press

This book is an account of a disaster at sea, the sinking by a German submarine of the passenger liner Athenia sailing from Liverpool to Montreal, loaded with Americans, Canadians, and Europeans, attempting to cross the Atlantic before the outbreak of war. Although 112 people were lost, of whom 30