Related Books

Medical Latin in the Roman Empire
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: D. R. Langslow
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2000-06-08 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

Despite the ubiquitous importance of medicine in Roman literature, philosophy, and social history, the language of Latin medical texts has not been properly studied. This book presents the first systematic account of a part of this large, rich field. Concentrating on texts of `high' medicine written in educated, even literary,
Pelagonius and Latin Veterinary Terminology in the Roman Empire
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Adams
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1995-07-01 - Publisher: BRILL

This book collects new information about ueterinarii and veterinary treatises in the Roman world, and elucidates technical and other aspects of Latin veterinary language. The treatise of Pelagonius is at the core of the book, but reference is also made to the full range of texts which deal with animals,
Women and the Roman City in the Latin West
Language: en
Pages: 430
Authors: Emily Hemelrijk, Greg Woolf
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-07-18 - Publisher: BRILL

This multidisclinary collection of studies offers a compelling new vision of the role of women in Roman cities in Italy and the western provinces.
Patients and Healers in the High Roman Empire
Language: en
Pages: 208
Authors: Ido Israelowich
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-04-01 - Publisher: JHU Press

Drawing on a diverse range of sources—including patient testimonies; the writings of physicians, historians, and poets; and official publications of the Roman state—Patients and Healers in the High Roman Empire is a groundbreaking history of the culture of classical medicine.
'Greek' and 'Roman' in Latin Medical Texts
Language: en
Pages: 461
Authors: Brigitte Maire
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-07-04 - Publisher: BRILL

Latin medical texts transmit medical theories and practices that originated mainly in Greece. 'Greek' and 'Roman' in Latin Medical Texts studies the ways in which this cultural interaction led to innovations in the areas of anatomy, pathology and pharmacology, from the earliest Latin medical texts until well into the medieval